Oscar Grant

Oscar Grant

The Impossible Dream: Being Black in America is an ongoing project that aims to eulogize the lives of some of the young, unarmed black men who were fatally shot by the police in the United States.

The images of the subjects were those projected on TV screens and in newspapers after their stories had become front page news.  These photographs are how the world was introduced to them and how they will be remembered.  Their portraits are printed on Polaroid film with gold borders.  The gold is meant to give each victim a sense of dignity.

Each portrait is paired up with a vintage postcard from the city where the tragedy took place.  The front welcomes you to their grand city and colorfully accentuates its landmarks.  Even though these were tourist mementos, some of the postcard artwork depicts racist images, such as a black boy eating watermelon while sitting on the letter “i” in Missouri.  

The text on the back highlights the historical relationship between the city and African-Americans.  Quotes taken directly from the current Tourism Board website of each respective city.  The text sometimes provides the opposite view of the circumstances, while the photo represents the reality.  A handwritten note to a loved one describing a vacation is replaced by the date and circumstances of each man's death.

People have been striving for “The American Dream” since the term was coined in 1931, but each death of a black man gets us further away from that dream. 

 

Dontre Hamilton

Dontre Hamilton

The Impossible Dream: Being Black in America is an ongoing project that aims to eulogize the lives of some of the young, unarmed black men who were fatally shot by the police in the United States.

The images of the subjects were those projected on TV screens and in newspapers after their stories had become front page news.  These photographs are how the world was introduced to them and how they will be remembered.  Their portraits are printed on Polaroid film with gold borders.  The gold is meant to give each victim a sense of dignity.

Each portrait is paired up with a vintage postcard from the city where the tragedy took place.  The front welcomes you to their grand city and colorfully accentuates its landmarks.  Even though these were tourist mementos, some of the postcard artwork depicts racist images, such as a black boy eating watermelon while sitting on the letter “i” in Missouri.  

The text on the back highlights the historical relationship between the city and African-Americans.  Quotes taken directly from the current Tourism Board website of each respective city.  The text sometimes provides the opposite view of the circumstances, while the photo represents the reality.  A handwritten note to a loved one describing a vacation is replaced by the date and circumstances of each man's death.

People have been striving for “The American Dream” since the term was coined in 1931, but each death of a black man gets us further away from that dream. 

Eric Garner

Eric Garner

The Impossible Dream: Being Black in America is an ongoing project that aims to eulogize the lives of some of the young, unarmed black men who were fatally shot by the police in the United States.

The images of the subjects were those projected on TV screens and in newspapers after their stories had become front page news.  These photographs are how the world was introduced to them and how they will be remembered.  Their portraits are printed on Polaroid film with gold borders.  The gold is meant to give each victim a sense of dignity.

Each portrait is paired up with a vintage postcard from the city where the tragedy took place.  The front welcomes you to their grand city and colorfully accentuates its landmarks.  Even though these were tourist mementos, some of the postcard artwork depicts racist images, such as a black boy eating watermelon while sitting on the letter “i” in Missouri.  

The text on the back highlights the historical relationship between the city and African-Americans.  Quotes taken directly from the current Tourism Board website of each respective city.  The text sometimes provides the opposite view of the circumstances, while the photo represents the reality.  A handwritten note to a loved one describing a vacation is replaced by the date and circumstances of each man's death.

People have been striving for “The American Dream” since the term was coined in 1931, but each death of a black man gets us further away from that dream. 

John Crawford III

John Crawford III

The Impossible Dream: Being Black in America is an ongoing project that aims to eulogize the lives of some of the young, unarmed black men who were fatally shot by the police in the United States.

The images of the subjects were those projected on TV screens and in newspapers after their stories had become front page news.  These photographs are how the world was introduced to them and how they will be remembered.  Their portraits are printed on Polaroid film with gold borders.  The gold is meant to give each victim a sense of dignity.

Each portrait is paired up with a vintage postcard from the city where the tragedy took place.  The front welcomes you to their grand city and colorfully accentuates its landmarks.  Even though these were tourist mementos, some of the postcard artwork depicts racist images, such as a black boy eating watermelon while sitting on the letter “i” in Missouri.  

The text on the back highlights the historical relationship between the city and African-Americans.  Quotes taken directly from the current Tourism Board website of each respective city.  The text sometimes provides the opposite view of the circumstances, while the photo represents the reality.  A handwritten note to a loved one describing a vacation is replaced by the date and circumstances of each man's death.

People have been striving for “The American Dream” since the term was coined in 1931, but each death of a black man gets us further away from that dream. 

Michael Brown

Michael Brown

The Impossible Dream: Being Black in America is an ongoing project that aims to eulogize the lives of some of the young, unarmed black men who were fatally shot by the police in the United States.

The images of the subjects were those projected on TV screens and in newspapers after their stories had become front page news.  These photographs are how the world was introduced to them and how they will be remembered.  Their portraits are printed on Polaroid film with gold borders.  The gold is meant to give each victim a sense of dignity.

Each portrait is paired up with a vintage postcard from the city where the tragedy took place.  The front welcomes you to their grand city and colorfully accentuates its landmarks.  Even though these were tourist mementos, some of the postcard artwork depicts racist images, such as a black boy eating watermelon while sitting on the letter “i” in Missouri.  

The text on the back highlights the historical relationship between the city and African-Americans.  Quotes taken directly from the current Tourism Board website of each respective city.  The text sometimes provides the opposite view of the circumstances, while the photo represents the reality.  A handwritten note to a loved one describing a vacation is replaced by the date and circumstances of each man's death.

People have been striving for “The American Dream” since the term was coined in 1931, but each death of a black man gets us further away from that dream. 

Ezell Ford Jr.

Ezell Ford Jr.

The Impossible Dream: Being Black in America is an ongoing project that aims to eulogize the lives of some of the young, unarmed black men who were fatally shot by the police in the United States.

The images of the subjects were those projected on TV screens and in newspapers after their stories had become front page news.  These photographs are how the world was introduced to them and how they will be remembered.  Their portraits are printed on Polaroid film with gold borders.  The gold is meant to give each victim a sense of dignity.

Each portrait is paired up with a vintage postcard from the city where the tragedy took place.  The front welcomes you to their grand city and colorfully accentuates its landmarks.  Even though these were tourist mementos, some of the postcard artwork depicts racist images, such as a black boy eating watermelon while sitting on the letter “i” in Missouri.  

The text on the back highlights the historical relationship between the city and African-Americans.  Quotes taken directly from the current Tourism Board website of each respective city.  The text sometimes provides the opposite view of the circumstances, while the photo represents the reality.  A handwritten note to a loved one describing a vacation is replaced by the date and circumstances of each man's death.

People have been striving for “The American Dream” since the term was coined in 1931, but each death of a black man gets us further away from that dream. 

Laquan McDonald

Laquan McDonald

The Impossible Dream: Being Black in America is an ongoing project that aims to eulogize the lives of some of the young, unarmed black men who were fatally shot by the police in the United States.

The images of the subjects were those projected on TV screens and in newspapers after their stories had become front page news.  These photographs are how the world was introduced to them and how they will be remembered.  Their portraits are printed on Polaroid film with gold borders.  The gold is meant to give each victim a sense of dignity.

Each portrait is paired up with a vintage postcard from the city where the tragedy took place.  The front welcomes you to their grand city and colorfully accentuates its landmarks.  Even though these were tourist mementos, some of the postcard artwork depicts racist images, such as a black boy eating watermelon while sitting on the letter “i” in Missouri.  

The text on the back highlights the historical relationship between the city and African-Americans.  Quotes taken directly from the current Tourism Board website of each respective city.  The text sometimes provides the opposite view of the circumstances, while the photo represents the reality.  A handwritten note to a loved one describing a vacation is replaced by the date and circumstances of each man's death.

People have been striving for “The American Dream” since the term was coined in 1931, but each death of a black man gets us further away from that dream. 

Tamir Rice

Tamir Rice

The Impossible Dream: Being Black in America is an ongoing project that aims to eulogize the lives of some of the young, unarmed black men who were fatally shot by the police in the United States.

The images of the subjects were those projected on TV screens and in newspapers after their stories had become front page news.  These photographs are how the world was introduced to them and how they will be remembered.  Their portraits are printed on Polaroid film with gold borders.  The gold is meant to give each victim a sense of dignity.

Each portrait is paired up with a vintage postcard from the city where the tragedy took place.  The front welcomes you to their grand city and colorfully accentuates its landmarks.  Even though these were tourist mementos, some of the postcard artwork depicts racist images, such as a black boy eating watermelon while sitting on the letter “i” in Missouri.  

The text on the back highlights the historical relationship between the city and African-Americans.  Quotes taken directly from the current Tourism Board website of each respective city.  The text sometimes provides the opposite view of the circumstances, while the photo represents the reality.  A handwritten note to a loved one describing a vacation is replaced by the date and circumstances of each man's death.

People have been striving for “The American Dream” since the term was coined in 1931, but each death of a black man gets us further away from that dream. 

Freddie Gray

Freddie Gray

The Impossible Dream: Being Black in America is an ongoing project that aims to eulogize the lives of some of the young, unarmed black men who were fatally shot by the police in the United States.

The images of the subjects were those projected on TV screens and in newspapers after their stories had become front page news.  These photographs are how the world was introduced to them and how they will be remembered.  Their portraits are printed on Polaroid film with gold borders.  The gold is meant to give each victim a sense of dignity.

Each portrait is paired up with a vintage postcard from the city where the tragedy took place.  The front welcomes you to their grand city and colorfully accentuates its landmarks.  Even though these were tourist mementos, some of the postcard artwork depicts racist images, such as a black boy eating watermelon while sitting on the letter “i” in Missouri.  

The text on the back highlights the historical relationship between the city and African-Americans.  Quotes taken directly from the current Tourism Board website of each respective city.  The text sometimes provides the opposite view of the circumstances, while the photo represents the reality.  A handwritten note to a loved one describing a vacation is replaced by the date and circumstances of each man's death.

People have been striving for “The American Dream” since the term was coined in 1931, but each death of a black man gets us further away from that dream. 

William Chapman

William Chapman

The Impossible Dream: Being Black in America is an ongoing project that aims to eulogize the lives of some of the young, unarmed black men who were fatally shot by the police in the United States.

The images of the subjects were those projected on TV screens and in newspapers after their stories had become front page news.  These photographs are how the world was introduced to them and how they will be remembered.  Their portraits are printed on Polaroid film with gold borders.  The gold is meant to give each victim a sense of dignity.

Each portrait is paired up with a vintage postcard from the city where the tragedy took place.  The front welcomes you to their grand city and colorfully accentuates its landmarks.  Even though these were tourist mementos, some of the postcard artwork depicts racist images, such as a black boy eating watermelon while sitting on the letter “i” in Missouri.  

The text on the back highlights the historical relationship between the city and African-Americans.  Quotes taken directly from the current Tourism Board website of each respective city.  The text sometimes provides the opposite view of the circumstances, while the photo represents the reality.  A handwritten note to a loved one describing a vacation is replaced by the date and circumstances of each man's death.

People have been striving for “The American Dream” since the term was coined in 1931, but each death of a black man gets us further away from that dream.